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Thread: Avoiding/minimizing bone loss after castration

  1. #1

    Avoiding/minimizing bone loss after castration

    I've browsed through the existing threads, and haven't found all the information about bone loss in one place. So I thought I'd start a new thread.

    I am in my 60's and have been injecting Everclear into my balls for the last several months. I have experienced shrinkage, hot flashes, and night sweats. So I expect I have my natural testosterone level down to castrate-level. I'm going soon to my primary care doctor, for lab tests, and then (I hope) referral to a urologist.

    With that as background, I am concerned about preventing or minimizing bone loss. I'm focused on 2 things: measuring bone density and dietary supplements.

    As to measuring bone density, I assume the thing to start with is a bone density scan, the sooner the better. I think women are routinely encouraged to have a scan, starting in their late 50's. By contrast, I have never had a doctor suggest a bone scan for me, anytime in my late 50's or now in my early 60's. I assume that's because bone loss is so common with post-menoposal women, and not so common with (uncastrated) men in the same age range. Do I get a bone density scan just by asking for one? I assume it would be good to have a baseline measurement, before any bone loss sets in. Do I just give the reason that it seems to me that I should have a scan to set a personal baseline?

    Next, as to dietary supplements, I've seen plenty of posts that suggest calcium, magnesium, and Vitamin D. Several posters suggest that the calcium should be calcium citrate, not calcium carbonate. Is calcium citrate the preferred type of supplemental calcium to prevent bone loss?

    Next, about magnesium, I've read posts that say the body cannot use calcium supplements without adding magnesium. Is that true? If so, what's the best form or source for supplemental magnesium?

    Next, about Vitamin D, I've read posts that suggest taking a supplement that combines various types of Vitamin D. Others insist that you should take only D3. What's the story on Vitamin D?

    I assume there are foods that are especially good sources for calcium, magnesium, and Vitamin D, and I plan to research that and be sure those foods are part of my regular diet. I assume that getting these things from food is always preferable to getting them in pill form.

    I welcome any answers, comments, or suggestions. Thanks!

  2. #2

    Re: Avoiding/minimizing bone loss after castration

    My urologist told me to take an over the counter calcium tablet twice a day. 600mg in the morning and another at night. I also get an annual bone scan. So far, so good.
    Castrated with a scrotal reduction by my urologist in a local hospital, Sept. 3, 2015.
    Eunuch lives matter!

  3. #3

    Re: Avoiding/minimizing bone loss after castration

    calcium allone doesn't make sense, because you also need a hormone to bind it on the bones structures.
    Low dose Testosterone or also Tamoxifene prevent osteoporose. Also using estrogen if feminization isn't a problem is really good.
    There are also testosterone derivate available and you can hold good muscles and have a general good health (eg. Boldenone is one of it).

  4. #4

    Re: Avoiding/minimizing bone loss after castration

    I went 2.5 years no T and did Calcium, Magnesium,Vitamin D and a good multivitamin with no bone loss.

  5. #5

    Re: Avoiding/minimizing bone loss after castration

    Thanks for your replies. Does anyone want to offer specific types or daily dosages of calcium, magnesium, and/or Vitamin D?

  6. #6

    Re: Avoiding/minimizing bone loss after castration

    sparkey seems to have a general good health status without testosterone, but the most castrated man have this good condition.
    Be patient and ask your doc to monitor it!

  7. #7
    agent provocateur Jesus's Avatar
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    Re: Avoiding/minimizing bone loss after castration

    Contrary to popular belief on the EA, itís not testosterone, but estrogen that protects bone health. The aromatase enzyme converts some of the testosterone that an intact male produces into estrogen.

    The risk of osteoporosis is greatest in individuals who are estrogen-deprived. This includes both post-menopausal women and men without sufficient testosterone to convert to the small amount of estrogen needed.

    A base-line bone density scan would certainly be useful. They are generally easy to get if you are willing to pay for it. Otherwise, it would be up to a physician to request it. If your physician is reluctant, you might claim (perhaps falsely) that you have a family history of osteoporosis.

    The other action to take is supplemental vitamins and minerals. In general, anyone who is androgen/estrogen-deprived should be taking supplemental calcium and vitamin D. It doesn't really matter that much the form of the calcium provided. The vitamin D is necessary for proper processing of the calcium; there is no one secret or best formula for the combination. It's just that some forms are more easily absorbed than others. There is also no benefit in taking an amount above that recommended doses, but one needs to be careful because truly excessive calcium can lead to kidney stones and muscle cramps.

    In terms of actual activities that might protect the bone, impact loading exercises have been shown to be beneficial. Anyone with low testosterone/estrogen should be encouraged to seriously put into his exercise routine some impact loading activities, such as jogging, tennis, etc.

    The other thing anyone might consider doing is wearing a estradiol patch or using an Estrogel product to get some add-back estrogen to replace the small amount that converted testosterone would be providing.

    A cooperative and understanding physician would certainly be most helpful.
    Nature loves variety. Unfortunately, society hates it.

  8. #8

    Re: Avoiding/minimizing bone loss after castration

    Jesus good information I would add the need for Magnesium to help assimilate the Calcium need that balance.

  9. #9
    Happily Fully Qualified Regular daifu-orchid's Avatar
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    Re: Avoiding/minimizing bone loss after castration

    Thanks J!
    Seems also that while nobody wants badly demineralized bones, the expected association with bone strength and ease of fracture seems only weakly linked at best. Maybe take your doc's advice. I know that early enthusiasm for bone calcium enhancing medication seems to have cooled recently. It may put calcium in the bones, without necessarily making them stronger.
    Eat well, live well, and take the doc's advice!

  10. #10
    Happily Fully Qualified Regular daifu-orchid's Avatar
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    Re: Avoiding/minimizing bone loss after castration

    Seems that castration is not necessarily bad for you, in fact it may extend life:
    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/b...-living-longer

    Now, providing your doc is as understanding as J wishes.... Who knows what is possible?

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